Archive for the ‘History Rocky Hill Historical Society’ Category

History of Rocky Hill Historical Society: First Fifty Years

October 22, 2012

John Serra, our hardworking treasurer and researcher, has written “History of the Rocky Hill Historical Society: The First Fifty Years (1962-2012)”, in observance of the society’s anniversary. The document lists the people who volunteered and the events that took place in Academy Hall Museum and also off site.

In 1970, for example, academy Hall was nominated to the National Register of Historic Places. Eight women know as the Barbersharps sung patriotic songs. Historical society member from Huntington, Long Island traveled by canoe on the Connecticut River to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. Many names and program titles can be found in the extensive history of our society.
(from the society’s newsletter; Jeff Gubala, Ed.)

The entire document can be read at the “John Serra: History…” in the “Pages” sidebar at the right.

A New History of Rocky Hill by Rafaele Fierro

July 3, 2012

Just published on the Wethersfield Historical Society website:

Rocky Hill: A History by Rafaele Fierro

It was only a matter of time. Rocky Hill citizens since the 1820s had been petitioning the Connecticut General Assembly to become a separate town. Now in 1843 the residents of Wethersfield’s “Lower Community,” known since 1722 as Stepney Parish, took up the issue anew but with more vigor and in more numbers. Town leader Elias W. Robbins led this local independence movement, which succeeded by June of 1843. Rocky Hill would be the new town’s official name and henceforth would become known as the “political daughter of Wethersfield” to its north. Rocky Hill was not unique in its quest for and success in separation. Two other towns–Glastonbury and Newington–also emerged from Wethersfield.

And today, out of the 169 incorporated towns in Connecticut, more than half were created when they split from their “mothers.” Indeed, between 1820 and 1850, the state’s General Assembly incorporated 13 new towns, including Rocky Hill, one steeped in tradition and history, and created as much by nature’s fury as by the power of Connecticut’s legislative body…(left Philip Goffe House)

Men like Goffe found the land appealing because it stood high above the river whose flood plains narrowed down, just south of the long hill for which the town would be named ultimately. And because it seemed logical to these early settlers to cross the river along this tapered stretch, they helped establish a transport service in 1655. Later known as the Rocky Hill-Glastonbury ferry service, it remains the oldest ferry service in the United States. The settlers also realized that the land could be used for building ships and farming. A classic riverport was about to be born.

(read the rest of this interesting history on the “Rafaele Fierro..” Page in sidebar at the right)


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